BEST Small Hotels in the West of Ireland

Killaloe Station House Waterfront B&B

, Ballina
, Co Tipperary
.

A luxury B&B right on the edge of the river where Lough Derg meets the River Shannon.

Double rooms from € 150
Guest rating 9.9

Barrow House

, Tralee
, Co Kerry
.

A country B&B right on the water's edge of a sheltered bay.

Double rooms from € 130
Guest rating 9.8

Maranatha Country House

, Blarney
, Co Cork
.

An exuberantly decorated Victorian country house B&B set in mature lawned and wooded gardens.

Double rooms from € 79
Guest rating 9.7

Ferndale Bed and Breakfast

, Achill Island
, Co Mayo
.

Exotically themed rooms in a luxury boutique B&B on the very edge of Europe.

Double rooms from € 105
Guest rating 9.7

Westbrook Country House

, Castlebar
, Co Mayo
.

A boutique B&B in a Georgian country house between Castlebar and Westport, Co Mayo.

Double rooms from € 100
Guest rating 9.7

Burren Glamping

, Kilfenora
, Co Clare
.

Glamorous camping in a cleverly converted horsebox makes a unique farm holiday on the Burren.

Double rooms from € 140
Guest rating 9.6

The Castle

, Castletownshend
, West Cork
.

A historic waterfront hotel on Castletownshend harbour.

Double rooms from € 90
Guest rating 9.6

Drumcreehy Country House

, Ballyvaughan
, Co Clare
.

An immaculate B&B with views in all directions, out over Galway Bay and up to the Burren.

Double rooms from € 90
Guest rating 9.5

Lough Inagh Lodge Hotel

, Connemara
, Co Galway
.

An outstanding country house hotel on the shore of Lough Inagh.

Double rooms from € 155
Guest rating 9.5

Carrig Country House

, Killorglin
, Co Kerry
.

A lakeside country house hotel with sumptuous interiors and glorious gardens.

Double rooms from € 150
Guest rating 9.4

Milltown House

, Dingle
, Co Kerry
.

A renowned boutique B&B right on the waterside of Dingle Harbour.

Double rooms from € 100
Guest rating 9.1
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Reasons to visit the West of Ireland

There is a raw beauty to Ireland's wild Atlantic coast as it winds it's way down from Donegal all the way to Cork. Unimaginably beautiful when the sun beams down across the blue sea, it reveals an altogether different character when the clouds come lower and the Atlantic swell roars in. You could see the same view a thousand times, and it would be different every time. This is the magic of the west coast of Ireland.

There's diving, surfing, boating and swimming to be done in the waters, and the deep bays are surprisingly sheltered. It's a coast for walking and cycling too, with spectacular views everywhere. The famous Cliffs of Moher rise vertically out of the water to over 200m. Yet they can be surpassed by the less famous Slieve League in Donegal which are more than three times as high. Further south are Dingle, the Ring of Kerry, Kenmare and Bantry Bay, all blessed with a wealth of rich history and culture.

Beyond the coast there's much more to see. The mountains of Ireland are not large by world standards, but size isn't everything. They are numerous, beautiful and rugged.  Energetic visitors might want to climb to the top of Croagh Patrick, while others might opt for a pony and trap ride up the Gap of Dunloe beneath the peaks of McGillicuddy's Reeks.